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Surgery and Orthopedics

Our surgical team at Animal Medical Center is experienced in soft tissue and orthopedic surgery. We have laser, electro and conventional surgical capabilities at our disposal. We also utilize laser therapy with our K-LASER therapy unit. Our doctors have special interest in the following surgeries:

Exploratory Laparotomies:

Including gastric, intestinal, colonic, spleenic, liver/hepatic, kidney/renal, urinary bladder, urethral, ureter, abdominal masses, abdominal tumors, bladder stones/calculi, foreign bodies, gastric dilatation and volvulous (Bloat), and the more common ovariohysterectomies (spay) and orchidectomies (neuters), etc…..

Orthopedics:

Anything from splinting and casting for external stabilization to surgical pins, screws, wires and orthopedic plates for internal stabilization. Dr. Nay has special interest in fractured limbs, surgeries of the hip (coxofemoral joint), knee (including anterior cruciate, meniscus, patella, and fractures/trauma), elbow fractures/luxations. Dr. Nay has a personal special interest in ruptured anterior cruciate repair. Over the past 25 years, he has seen the most common rear leg lameness issue change from the hip to the knee. “Puppy nutrition and better containment systems (i.e. crate training, fenced-in backyards, under-ground invisible fences) have allowed young dogs to develop the coxofemoral joint more soundly. In the meantime, nutrition, which has allowed our pets to become overweight in their middle to older ages, has created a dog, heavier than optimal, which puts extraordinary, sheer force on the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL). So when “Jake “ (88 lb. Labrador) chases “Frisky” the squirrel around the yard and suddenly pulls up lame (sometimes with a “yelp”) it is considered to be a ruptured CCL until proven otherwise.”

The three most common and accepted orthopedic procedures (with some variations)are Tibial Plane Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO), Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA) and Extra Capsular Fixation (ECF). All, if performed properly, have success, and all will have some degree of osteoarthritis. I, for years, performed the ECF on all of the ruptured Cranial Cruciate Ligaments (rCCL) and had great success. I personally know of boarded surgeons that use this procedure exclusively. I still use this ECF procedure on all of my small to medium sized patients due to the lack of physical force they are able to apply to this fixation method.

Until recently, TPLO was widely regarded as “the” procedure for larger dogs. In the most basic description, the TPLO utilizes the Posterior Cruciate Ligament to stabilize the joint by making a rotary elliptical osteotomy and turns the osteotomized fragment to a position that now places the insertion portion of the posterior cruciate ligament more cranial to reduce the cranial Tibial thrust and, thus, closely mimics the function of a CCL.

The most recent procedure that has the orthopedic world abuzz is the TTA (Tibial tuberosity Advancement). This procedure utilizes one of the largest and strongest tendons (Patella tendon) to stabilize the knee and reduce the Tibial thrust. This procedure moves the insertion point of the patella tendon cranial (via TTA cage and TTA plate). The amount the tibial crest is advanced (or the TTA cage size) is determined on preoperative radiographs using a grid plate.

Dr. Nay’s youngest lab “Mac” (a large 96 pounds) avulsed his cruciate in July, and the next day Dr. Nay performed TTA procedure. “The hardest part for our clients, which I got to find out for my own, first hand, thanks to “Mac“, is that they seem to recover too quickly. So confinement after surgery is imperative.”

*We give detailed post surgical instructions that will include physical therapy when you pick up your family member. *Referral clients, please have a referral letter from your regular veterinarian or veterinary hospital.

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Animal Medical Center

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